Thursday, 27 February 2020
 
  Home arrow Community arrow Perth's Hindu temple consecrates a 'rajagopuram'
 
Main Menu
Home
Community
Cricket
Education
Entertainment
Environment
Gender
Health
Indigenous
Migration
News
Newsletters
Poliomyelitis
Small Business
Trade
Travel
About Us
Links
Search
Advertisement
Perth's Hindu temple consecrates a 'rajagopuram' PDF Print E-mail
© Neena Bhandari, Indo Asian News Service

ImageSydney, June 3 (IANS) A rich tapestry of pomp and colour marked the consecration of the intricately carved rajagopuram, or a royal tower, at the Hindu Temple in the Canning Vale suburb of Perth. It was a moment of pride for the 8,000-odd Hindu community in the state during the consecration on Sunday.

Australia is home to Hindus not only from the Indian sub-continent, but migrants from Singapore, Malaysia, Fiji and South Africa.

"Apart from being a place of worship, the temple and cultural centre will be for free community programmes, including a voluntary migrant assistance service, cultural and language classes and two radio programmes in Hindi and Tamil," West Australian Hindu Association president Mukesh Mani was quoted as saying in local media.

Hinduism has become one of the fastest growing religions in Australia. West Australian Premier Alan Carpenter told The Australian, and the temple was a "magnificent testament to the state's diverse culture. Anyone who comes here will be impressed. It's physically beautiful and the spirit of the place is beautiful."

The state government of Western Australia is said to have provided about A$600,000 towards the cost of the temple. It took nearly two decades for the rajagopuram, which displays Hindu deities, to be built by Indian artisans.

According to the latest census figures, Australia's three most common non-Christian religious affiliations were Buddhism (2.1 percent of the population), Islam (1.7 percent) and Hinduism (0.7 percent). Of these groups, Hinduism experienced the fastest proportional growth since 1996, more than doubling to 150,000.

Indian-born Dinesh Koteeswaran, a structural engineer who came to Perth about two years ago, told the local media, "I love Australia. It's (temple) really a wonderful thing for worshipping of god. We needed something religious and historic."

© Copyright Neena Bhandari. All rights reserved. Republication, copying or using information from any www.india-voice.com content is expressly prohibited without  the permission of the writer and the news agency through which the article is syndicated.

 
< Prev   Next >


Get The Best Free Joomla Templates at www.joomla-templates.com